Coaching

Creative Action: It’s Always Personal

There are no exercises to master, no times to beat.  The challenges aren’t primarily physical. The challenge, you could say, is for each of us to find an authentic way to express inspired action – daily. When it’s done in the context of fitness, it’s the most personal and meaningful form of fitness in the world.

For those who are new to the concept: activprayer is a way of doing physical actions that unite, inspire, and transform while helping us lead happier and healthier lives at the same time.

activprayers (“AP’s, as we call them) are actions as simple as washing the dishes to something as strenuous as running a marathon. No matter what the action, it can be invested with the meaning and power to reach hundreds, thousands, and in some cases millions of people…long after the last movement is done.

Every activprayer is made up of two parts: an intention and an action.

The intention is someone or something that you want to dedicate an action to – it’s the answer to the question “Why?” It’s always an intention that you care about, that inspires you to dedicate an ordinary action and – because it has been dedicated – to do it differently than you normally would….To do it in an extraordinary way that expresses what that intention means to you: not in words, but in action.

Think of an activprayer like giving a gift…it’s a gift of inspired action! That’s a gift that could never be bought. It’s the gift of your very self, acting in an inspired way for an intention greater than self.

The second part of the activprayer, the action, is always unique to who you are and how YOU want to express the intention you’re dedicating your action to. This is important.

Someone may have posted an activprayer for his daughter’s 19th birthday by running 19 miles in a single day (practically a marathon!) as his inspired action.  That’s awesome.

To join this activprayer, though, you don’t have to run 19 miles! You simply have to identify with the intention, make it personal, and dedicate your own action to it in any way that you feel inspired to do it. You may have a son who is 14, and instead of running 14 miles (the last time you ran 1 mile was high school, and it was torture), you’re going to ride your bike for 14 miles and dedicate your ride to him in some way. Or maybe you don’t care as much about the number 14 at all: you just want to play catch with him in the backyard.  These are inspired actions, and they’re every bit as much of an activprayer as the first one.

Inspired action is always creative action. The intentions are yours, and the actions are your inspired action. Only you know what that looks like. And the beauty of it is this: there is no limit to what you can do and the impact that you can make, not only on the object of your intention but on the thousands of people who you may inspire by dedicating your action to an intention greater than self. You never know who’s watching. If you don’t believe that, watch this video of a kid who witnessed Paul Theodore’s “Pull-ups for Zoe” activprayer.

So take courage! You’re building this movement every bit as much as we are, and it’s your inspired actions that inspire US to continue supporting and developing the tools that help us unite and serve. It’s you who make this community special.

There’s no better day to start off with a Heroic Minute, and an intention greater than self to dedicate your most inspired actions to: done with care, done with integrity, done with love.

Eyes up, Rise Up. Today is a great day to start rising.

 

 

Luke Burgis
Luke Burgis, CSCS, is a Co-Founder of ActivPrayer, an architect of the activMAP, and a sports and performance coach that has worked in the nutrition and fitness industries for over 10 years. He graduated with a B.S. in Finance from NYU and also completed an S.T.B. in Sacred Theology at a university in Italy where he worked closely with the Vatican's office of Church & Sport about the role of sports and fitness in renewing cultures.

He is a well-known public speaker on the topics of entrepreneurship, fitness, and faith.
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